Polyphemus Moth

Polyphemus Moth [Antheraea polyphemus] photos were taken at Ridgefield Court, Asheville, North Carolina on 16 July 2019.

Polyphemus Moth – 16 July 2019

Polyphemus Moth – Side View – 16 July 2019

Polyphemus Moth – Front View – 16 July 2019

Carolina Horse-Nettle

Carolina Horse-Nettle [Solanum carolinense] photos were taken on White Pine Road and Troy Hill Circle on 7 July 2013 and in Fletcher on 1 June 2019. It’s a member of the Potato (Solanaceae) family and genus Nightshade.  Wildflowers of the Carolinas, pages 240-241, says it blooms in summer and grows in “dry sandy soils, disturbed areas, fields, lawns, and sun.”  It also states “the fruit resembles a tiny tomato” and “is poisonous and has killed deer, cattle and humans.”

USDA Plants Listing: Solanum carolinense

Carolina Horse-Nettle – 1 June 2019

Carolina Horse-Nettle on White Pine Road - 7 July 2013

Carolina Horse-Nettle on White Pine Road – 7 July 2013

Carolina Horse-Nettle (side view) - Troy Hill Circle - 7 July 2013

Carolina Horse-Nettle (side view) – Troy Hill Circle – 7 July 2013

Carolina Horse-Nettle (two flowers) - 7 July 2013

Carolina Horse-Nettle (two flowers) – 7 July 2013

Showy Orchis

Showy Orchis [Galearis spectabilis] photos were taken on the Appalachian Trail (AT), between US 19E and Doll Flats, near Roan Mountain, Tennessee, on 14 May 2016 and near Gerton on 29 April 2018. It’s the member of the Orchid (Orchidaceae) family.  Timothy P. Spira’s Wildflowers & Plant Communities of the Southern Appalachian Mountains & Piedmont, page 375, states that the flowers bloom from April-May, and bare fruit May through June, and it “often occurs in calcium-rich soils, but not exclusively.”

 
USDA Plants Listing: Galearis spectabilis

Showy Orchis on the AT - 14 May 2016

Showy Orchis on the AT – 14 May 2016

Showy Orchis (in) - 14 May 2016

Showy Orchis (in) – 14 May 2016

Showy Orchis (out) - 14 May 2016

Showy Orchis (out) – 14 May 2016

 

Showy Orchis – Dan – 29 April 2018
Showy Orchis in Gerton – 29 April 2018

Star Chickweed

These Star Chickweed [Stellaria pubera], a member of the Pink (Caryophyllaceae) family, were found in Gerton, North Carolina on 4 May 2013 and on 14 April 2018.  Newcomb’s Wildflower Guide, pages 274-275, states it’s found in woods and on rocky slopes.  It’s listed in the flowers with 5 regular parts section, but the petals are so deeply cleft that they look like they have 10 parts.  These specimens were just off a footpath of the same roadside trail in the woods on both occasions.

USDA Plants Listing:  Stellaria pubera

Star Chickweed – 14 April 2018

Star Chickweed in Gerton, NC – 4 May 2013

Star Chickweed (more) – 4 May 2013

Cut-leaved Toothwort or Pepperroot

Cut-Leaved Toothwort [Cardamine concatenata] found off a new path at Fletcher Park on 5 April 2014, on Bearwallow Mountain on 23 April 2016, and in Gerton, NC on 14 April 2018.  It’s a member of the Mustard (Brassicaceae) family. Newcomb’s Wildflower Guide, pages 162-63, states it blooms in spring in rich woods.  Another synonym for the flower is Dentaria laciniata, and it also gives it another English name of Pepperroot.  The color is a little washed out, but it’s a white or pink flower.

USDA Plants Listing: Cardamine concatenata

Cut-leaved Toothwort – 14 Apr 2018

Cut-leaved Toothwort at Fletcher Park - 5 April 2014

Cut-leaved Toothwort at Fletcher Park – 5 April 2014

Cut-leaved Toothwort on Bearwallow Mountain- 23 April 2016

Cut-leaved Toothwort on Bearwallow Mountain- 23 April 2016

Cut-Leaved Toothwort (zoom out) - 23 April 2016

Cut-Leaved Toothwort (zoom out) – 23 April 2016

Two-lined Spittlebug

Two-lined Spittlebug [Prosapia bicinta] photos were taken in Flat Rock, North Carolina on 4 August 2017, found on a side window of my vehicle. The NWF Field Guide to Insects and Spiders of North America, page 136, says “adults jump when they are disturbed; they also release a yellow fluid from the feet, which might serve to deter predators.”

Two-lined Spittlebug – 4 August 2017

Two-lined Spittlebug (alt) – 4 August 2017

American Bellflower or Tall Bellflower

American Bellflower or Tall Bellflower [Campanulastrum americanum] found near mile marker 437 on the Blue Ridge Parkway on 25 July 2013 and 23 July 2017. It’s a member of the Shinleaf (Pyrolaceae) family. Newcomb’s Wildflower Guide, pages 216-217, says it blooms in summer and fall in moist thickets.  The guide lists it’s scientific name as Campanula americana.

USDA Plants Listing: http://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=CAAM18

American Bellflower on Blue Ridge Parkway - 25 July 2013

American Bellflower on Blue Ridge Parkway – 25 July 2013

American Bellflower (more) - 25 July 2013

American Bellflower (more) – 25 July 2013

American Bellflower – 23 Jul 2017

Hummingbird Moth

Hummingbird Moth [Hemaris thysbe] photos were taken near Fletcher Park on 2 July 2017. The NWF Field Guide to Insects and Spiders of North America, page 333 says “on spring and summer days, these moths hover over flowers in open habitats…”  

Hummingbird Moth approaching Everlasting Pea – 2 July 2017

Hummingbird Moth on Common Milkweed – 2 July 2017

Hummingbird Moth (more detail) – 2 July 2017

Hummingbird Moth (wing detail) – 2 July 2017

Hummingbird Moth (head detail) – 2 July 2017

Common Mullein

Common Mullein [Verbascum thapsus] found near the Silver Leaf Diner, off US Route 11 in DeKalb Junction, New York on 21 June 2013 and at Biltmore Estate on 24 June 2017. It’s a member of the Figwort (Scrophulariaceae) family, with it’s distinctive woolly leaves. Newcomb’s Wildflower Guide, pages 188-189, says that it blooms in summer and fall, and found on roadsides and in fields.

USDA Plants Listing:  http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=VETH

Common Mullein near Silver Leaf Diner - 21 June 2013

Common Mullein near Silver Leaf Diner – 21 June 2013

Common Mullein (top view) - 21 June 2013

Common Mullein (top view) – 21 June 2013

Common Mullein (Biltmore duo) – 24 June 2017

Common Mullein (zoom out) at Biltmore – 24 June 2017

Common Mullein (Biltmore) – 24 June 2017

 

Boxelder Bug

Boxelder Bugs [Boisea trivittata] were found at Carrier Park on Amboy Road in Asheville, North Carolina on 17 June 2017. The NWF Field Guide to Insects and Spiders of North America, page 128 says “adults and larvae take sap from seeds, flowers, and leaves, but cause little damage.”

Boxelder Bug – 17 June 2017

Boxelder Bug (groups) – 17 June 2017