Tag: wildflowers

Common Blue Violet

Common Blue Violet [Viola papilionacea] found in the Vining backyard on 21 April 2013.  It a member of the Violet (Violaceae) family, according to Wildflowers of the Carolinas, pages 26-27 and which says many previously divided violet species are lumped together under the Viola sororia name . USDA Plants Link:  http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=VISO  

Garlic Mustard

This interesting wildflower was found at Fletcher Park on 20 & 21 April 2013.   Garlic Mustard [Alliaria petiolata or Alliaria officinalis] has coarsely-toothed leaves with small 4-petal, white flowers.  It is a member of the Mustard (Brassicaceae) family.  Newcomb’s Wildflower Guide, pages 138-139, says the “leaves smell of garlic when crushed.” USDA Plant Listing: http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ALPE4

Bugle-weed

Bugle-weed or Common Bugle [Ajuga reptans] found at 106 Troy Hill on 21 April 2013.  Newcomb’s Wildflower Guide, pages 84-85, lists it as another escapee from cultivation to lawns and roadsides.  It’s a member of the Mint (Lamiaceae) family. USDA Plants Link:  http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=AJRE  

Azure Bluet

These Azure Bluets [Houstonia caerulea] were found at Fletcher Park on 21 April 2013.  They are a member of the Madder (Rubiaceae) family, so says Wildflowers of the Carolinas on pages 20-21.  It also known as Quaker Ladies. USDA Plants Link:  http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=HOCA4

Common or Philadelphia Fleabane

These wildflowers were found at Fletcher Park on 20 April 2013.  It appears to be Common or Philadelphia Fleabane [Erigeron philadelphicus], a member of the Aster (Asteraceae) family and is an early Spring bloomer.  Newcomb’s Wildflower Guide, pages 382-383, states the upper leaves clasp the stem. USDA Plants Link:  http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ERPH

Golden Ragwort

Found in the Vining backyard near a sink-hole.  What symmetry!  It appears to be Golden Ragwort [Packera aurea], from the Aster (Asteraceae) family.  According to the USDA, it blooms in March-April. USDA Plants Listing: Packera aurea  

St. Anthony’s Turnip or Bulbous Buttercup

This flower was found around the back on the Fletcher Plant.  It appears to be St. Anthony’s Turnip or Bulbous Buttercup [Ranunculus bulbosus], from the Buttercup (Ranunculaceae) family.  Found on pages 366-367 of Wildflowers of the Carolinas. USDA Plants Listing:  http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=RABU

Purple Deadnettle

These photos of Purple Deadnettle [Lamium purpureum] where taken at Fletcher Park on 16 March 2013.  Newcomb’s Wildflower Guide, pages 86-87, says it’s a member of the mint (Lamiaceae) family that blooms Spring to Fall on roadsides and in waste places.  It does have a square stem. USDA Plant Listing: Lamium purpureum Purple Deadnettle – 16 …

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Early Common Dandelion

The most prevalent of wildflowers, the Common Dandelion [Taraxacum officinale] is a member of the Aster (Asteraceae) family.  It is found on pages 368-369 of Wildflowers of the Carolinas.  “In French, dent-de-lion refers to the toothed leaves, which resemble the teeth of a lion.”  These early Dandelions were found in the fields at Fletcher Park …

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Morning Glory

This photo was taken at Fletcher Park on 20 October 2012.  The Wildflowers of the Carolinas, page 162, shows a photo of Tall Morning Glory [Ipomoea purpurea], member of the Morning Glory (Convolvulaceae) family. USDA Plants Listing:  http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=IPPU2