Fringed Puccoon or Narrowleaf Stoneseed

Fringed Puccoon or Narrowleaf Stoneseed [Lithospermum incisum] found outside Broken Bow, Nebraska on 20 May 2021. It’s a member of the Borage (Boraginaceae) family. National Wildlife Federation’s Wildflowers of North America, page 161, states it blooms in spring and summer on roadsides, in open woods, and on prairies. It is different from the from the Hoary Puccoon and Western Puccoon, in that its flowers have jagged edges.

USDA Plants Listing: Lithospermum incisum

Fringed Puccoon – 20 May 2021

Fringed Puccoon – 20 May 2021

Yellow or Western Salsify

Yellow or Western Salsify [Tragopogon dubius] found in Concordia, Kansas and Grand Island, Nebraska on 18 and 19 May 2021, respectively. It’s a member of the Aster (Asteraceae or Compositae) family. National Wildlife Federation’s Wildflowers of North America, page 569, states this species was introduced from Europe, blooms in Summer in disturbed places, and is widespread. Its common genus name is goatsbeard and its bracts are longer than a Tragopogon pratensis.

USDA Plants Listing: Tragopogon dubius

Yellow Salsify – Concordia, KS – 18 May 2021

Yellow Salsify – Grand Island, NE – 19 May 2021

Goat’s-Beard or Yellow Salsify

Goat’s-Beard or Yellow Salsify [Tragopogon dubius] seen at Alma Creamery, Alma, Kansas on 17 May 2021 and Grand Island, Nebraska on 19 May 2021. It’s a member of the Aster (Asteraceae / Compositae) family. National Wildlife Federation’s Wildflowers of North America page 569, records that it was introduced species and the USDA site has it found in most of the United States and Canada.

USDA Plants Listing: Tragopogon dubius

Goat’s-Beard – Alma, Kansas – 17 May 2021

Goat’s-Beard – Alma, Kansas – 17 May 2021

Goat’s-Beard – Grand Island, Nebraska

 

A Visit to Salina, Kansas

A visit to Salina, Kansas on 17 May 2021.

Abilene, Kansas and Dwight D. Eisenhower

Only the grounds of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library, Museum, and Boyhood home could be viewed in Abilene, Kansas on 17 May 2021.

Monarch Caterpillars

Monarch caterpillars [Danaus plexippus] found in Fletcher, North Carolina on 14 September 2018, and in our backyard on 24 August 2019 and 6 September 2020.  Also shown is caterpillar excrement, called “frass.”  Reader’s Digest North American Wildlife, page 264, shows that this species can be found throughout the United States, southern Canada, and parts of Mexico.

Butterflies and Moths of North America: Danaus plexippus

Monarch Caterpillar – 14 September 2018

Monarch Caterpillar 24 August 2019

Monarch Caterpillar – 6 September 2020

Monarch Caterpillar – 6 September 2020

Monarch Caterpillar Frass – 6 September 2020

Maryland Meadow Beauty

Maryland Meadow Beauty [Rhexia mariana] found at Creasman Farms, Hendersonville, North Carolina on 5 September 2020. It’s a member of the Meadow Beauty (Rhexia) family and has “eight conspicuous yellow stamens.” Newcomb’s Wildflower Guide, pages 160-161, states it blooms in summer in low meadows and sandy swamps.

USDA Plants Listing: Rhexia mariana

Maryland Meadow Beauty – 5 September 2020

Maryland Meadow Beauty – 5 September 2020

Maryland Meadow Beauty – 5 September 2020

Grass Spider

Grass Spider [Agelenopsis pennsylvanica] found on the roadside of the Blue Ridge Parkway on 1 September 2020. The NWF Field Guide to Insects and Spiders of North America, page 398, says their “web has a retreat tunnel that serves as a shelter; it is not sticky; insect prey are rushed, captured, and hauled to the retreat.”

Grass Spider – 1 September 2020

Grass Spider – 1 September 2020

Monkey Grass or Big Blue Lilyturf

Monkey Grass or Big Blue Lilyturf [Liriope muscari] photographed in the Vining yard on 30 August 2020. It’s a member of the Lily (Liliaceae) family, was brought from Asia, and used as a border plant. Ours is on the border of a slope with Winter Creeper. The first photo was taken by Martha with her macro lens and iPhone 8.

USDA Plants Listing:  Liriope muscari

Monkey Grass – 30 August 2020

Monkey Grass – 30 August 2020

Monkey Grass – 30 August 2020

St. Andrew’s Cross

St. Andrew’s Cross[Hypericum hypericoides] photographed in the Vining yard on 9 July 2013 and 30 August 2020. It’s a member of the Mangosteen (Clusiaceae) family, genus St. Johnswort. Wildflowers of the Carolinas, pages 330-331, says it blooms in summer and fall and can be found in “dry to moist sandy or rocky soils, pinewoods, bogs.” There are many Dwarf Cinquefoil plants growing with these flowers.

USDA Plants Listing: Hypericum hypericoides

St. Andrew's Cross in Vining backyard - 9 July 2013

St. Andrew’s Cross in Vining backyard – 9 July 2013

St Andrews Cross (with hand) - 9 July 2013

St Andrews Cross (with hand) – 9 July 2013

St. Andrews Cross – 30 August 2020

St. Andrews Cross – 30 August 2020

St. Andrews Cross – 30 August 2020